Tina Gonsalves: Artist Gonsalves’ (http://www.tinagonsalves.com) creative investigations draw from a long-term interdisciplinary and collaborative practice merging art, technology and science, exploring social relationships, trust and intimacy.

From 1995 to 2001, Gonsalves worked with visual imaging departments of hospitals within Australia, using diagnostic images as a departure point to explore complex emotional landscapes to create short films. These works were screened extensively in venues such as the Barbican, Pompidou and Australian Center of Moving Image, and are now in held in collections.

In 2002, after an inspiring residency awarded by the Banff Center for the Arts, Gonsalves pursued research to explore how her artwork could probe the audiences' emotional body to drive emotive moving image works. This lead to wearable technology artworks projects such as “Medulla Intimata” 2004, that monitored prosody of the wearer, to trigger intimate and provocative moving image that were displayed on the necklace, and shared with others. The piece attempted to disrupt codes of social behaviours, with an agenda to create more intimate and ‘authentic’ communication between each other. The piece was exhibited extensively including ICA London, Siggraph USA and ISEA Helsinki. This mobile work lead to “Tryst “2006/2007, research in how prosody could be used to trigger video over mobile phone networks.

In 2005, Gonsalves was awarded the prestigious AHRC/ACE international arts and Science fellowship to become artist in resident at the Institute of Neurology in London working with emotion neuroscientist Hugo Critchley. The award gave her a postdoctoral standing, and a window of opportunity to further explore how emotions are triggered and shaped through an empirical lense. Critchley and Gonsalves embarked on the Feel Series, a range of work that further investigated the use of emotion recognition sensors to monitor emotional signatures of the body, looking at voice, heart, sweat and movement. By working with neuroscientists, Gonsalves aimed to intelligently assess the data emitted by the body, to understand how it relates to a feeling state of the participant, and match this information to drive meaningful moving images. Another aim was to move beyond obtrusive technology to monitor the body. By working with affective computing scientists, human computer interaction specialists and neuroscientists, the aim was to research and develop more naturalistic and transparent monitoring techniques. A further aim of the Feel Series was to move beyond ambiguous generative abstract moving images or sound to respond to the data of the body. Gonsalves worked with scientists to produce figurative and narrative based video works that could engage, reflect and provoke the feelings of the viewer.

In 2007, she was awarded the Wellcome Large Art Award (, and numerous other awards (Australian Network for Art and Technology , Australia Arts council , Arts Council England and in kind support (Banff Center, Media Lab, Institute of Neurology, Science Museum London) to continue her collaboration with Critchley, and to work on a large interactive video art installation “Chameleon”. The project explores ideas of how we infect each other with emotions, (emotional contagion) with UK based neuroscientists Critchley and Chris Frith, Affective computer scientists Roz Picard, and El kaliouby at the MIT Medialab, Cambridge.

In 2007, Gonsalves’ lead international workshops for Nokia Design, Helsinki in Venice. The focus was on the development of more empathic, creative and intimate future interaction scenarios for Nokia’s mobile media.

These artworks have provided important insights into how to monitor emotion, how to induce emotional responses through translating emotional feelings into vision and sound, and how to create more naturalistic, playful and engaging interaction and interfaces that evoke intimacy and the methods of creating an successful science and art collaboration. Cultural critic, Darren Tofts writes : “Gonsalves’ most recent body of work is also taking media art into uncharted territory. Or rather, it is making creative incursions into a territory for too long thought impenetrable, the historical impasse, or rather chasm, of C.P. Snow’s “two cultures” … The ambitious Feel series (2006-ongoing) crystallizes this understanding of art as a poetic of strange, unlikely and often unnerving encounters between physical bodies and technology, between ideas and discipline.. Gonsalves’ artistic sensibility absorbs scientific hypothesis and technological possibility into an interface, a psycho-somatic stage, at once theatre of cruelty, emotional catharsis and critical insight’.

Chris Frith studied natural sciences at the University of Cambridge. He subsequently trained in clinical psychology at the University of London's Institute of Psychiatry. Since completing his Ph.D. (with H J Eysenck) on leaning and individual differences in 1969, he has worked as a research scientist funded initially by the Medical Research Council and subsequently by the Wellcome Trust. With the MRC he worked in Tim Crow’s unit at Northwick Park Hospital on the biological basis of schizophrenia exploring the neuropsychological basis of the symptoms of schizophrenia. Here he was involved in some of the very earliest studies of structural brain changes in schizophrenia. He then moved to the MRC cyclotron unit, where he carried out some of the earliest functional brain imaging studies of consciousness, volition and theory of mind. He had a key role in setting up the Functional Imaging Laboratory at the Institute of Neurology funded by the Wellcome Trust. He is currently Professor in Neuropsychology at UCL and Deputy Director of the Functional Imaging Laboratory and works on the neural basis of social interactions.

Awards:

Honorary Doctorate, University of York, 2004.

IgNobel Prize for Medicine, 2003 (Navigation-Related Structural Change In the Hippocampi of Taxi Drivers, E Maguire et al.)

Honorary Doctorate, Paris-Lodron University, Salzburg, 2003

Elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2001

President of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness, 2001

Elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, 2000

Elected a Guarantor of Brain, 1999

Kenneth Craik Award (St John’s College, Cambridge), 1999

Elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences, 1999

Member of the Academia Europaea, 1999.

The Book Award of the British Psychological Society “The cognitive Neuropsychology of Schizophrenia”, 1996.

Hugo Dyfrig Critchley

Present Position Foundation Professor of Psychiatry, Brighton and Sussex Medical School

University of Sussex Falmer Campus, Brighton BN1 9PX

Honorary Consultant Neuropsychiatrist Sussex Partnership NHS Trust

Previous position Wellcome Senior Fellow in Clinical Science at Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience (now Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging)

Honorary Senior Lecturer, UCL Institute of Neurology

Group leader, Clinical Psychophysiology, UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience

Consultant Neuropsychiatrist National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery

Consultant for Tourette Syndrome Clinic, NHNN

Qualifications BSc Physiology (1st Hons) 1987 University of Liverpool

MB ChB 1990 University of Liverpool Medical School

DPhil, Psychological Studies 1996 University of Oxford

MRCPsych 1997 Royal College of Psychiatrists UK

Section 12(2) approval MHA 1983

Membership Royal College of Psychiatrists British Neuropsychiatry Association

General Medical Council Medical Protection Society

Organization for Human Brain Mapping Clinical Autonomic Research Soc.

Society for Neurosciences American Psychosomatic Society

External grants:

2007-2008 Biofeedback treatment for Tourette Syndrome – Preliminary Randomized Controlled

Study $74,906USD to Dr Yoko Nagai, Prof Hugo Critchley, Prof Mary Robertson, Prof Eileen Joyce

2007-2010 Wellcome Trust programme grant (revision of Fellowship) £496,145.90

2004-2006 Wellcome Senior Fellowship £1,150,113, converted to programme grant 2007 “Psychophysiological mechanisms for psychological and physical morbidity”

2005-2006 AHRC arts and science research Fellowship scheme to support Tina Gonsalves (artist) in collaborative research “Investigating mechanisms of emotional entrainment through Art and Science £38,360.00

2001-2004 Wellcome Clinician Scientist Fellowship: Total amount £192,137 for 3 years

1998-2001 BRT Fellowship: with RJ Dolan CJ Mathias “Central autonomic control”

Prizes:

2006 Neal Miller Award, Academy of Behavioral Medicine

2006 President’s Award from American Psychosomatic Society

Over 200 publications in peer-reviewed journals

Member of the Board of Reviewing Editors for Science Magazine

Recent books:

Frackowiak, R.S.J., Friston, K.J., Frith, C.D., Dolan, R.J., Price, C.J., Zeki, S., Ashburner, J. & Penny W. (Eds.) (2004) Human Brain Function, 2nd edition. Academic Press, San Diego.

Frith, C.D. & Johnstone, E.C. (2003) Schizophrenia: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.

Frith, C.D. & Wolpert, D.M. (2004) The Neuroscience of Social Interaction: Decoding, imitating and influencing the actions of others. Oxford University Press.

Chris Frith studied natural sciences at the University of Cambridge. He subsequently trained in clinical psychology at the University of London's Institute of Psychiatry. Since completing his Ph.D. (with H J Eysenck) on leaning and individual differences in 1969, he has worked as a research scientist funded initially by the Medical Research Council and subsequently by the Wellcome Trust. With the MRC he worked in Tim Crow’s unit at Northwick Park Hospital on the biological basis of schizophrenia exploring the neuropsychological basis of the symptoms of schizophrenia. Here he was involved in some of the very earliest studies of structural brain changes in schizophrenia. He then moved to the MRC cyclotron unit, where he carried out some of the earliest functional brain imaging studies of consciousness, volition and theory of mind. He had a key role in setting up the Functional Imaging Laboratory at the Institute of Neurology funded by the Wellcome Trust. He is currently Professor in Neuropsychology at UCL and Deputy Director of the Functional Imaging Laboratory and works on the neural basis of social interactions.

Awards

Honorary Doctorate, University of York, 2004.

IgNobel Prize for Medicine, 2003 (Navigation-Related Structural Change In the Hippocampi of Taxi Drivers, E Maguire et al.)

Honorary Doctorate, Paris-Lodron University, Salzburg, 2003

Elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2001

President of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness, 2001

Elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, 2000

Elected a Guarantor of Brain, 1999

Kenneth Craik Award (St John’s College, Cambridge), 1999

Elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences, 1999

Member of the Academia Europaea, 1999.

The Book Award of the British Psychological Society “The cognitive Neuropsychology of Schizophrenia”, 1996.

 

Rosalind W. Picard is founder and director of the Affective Computing Research Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Laboratory and co-director of the Things That Think Consortium, the largest industrial sponsorship organization at the lab. She holds a Bachelors in Electrical Engineering with highest honors from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and Masters and Doctorate degrees, both in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She has been a member of the faculty at the MIT Media Laboratory since 1991, with tenure since 1998. Prior to completing her doctorate at MIT, she was a Member of the Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories where she designed VLSI chips for digital signal processing and developed new methods of image compression and analysis. She was honored as a Fellow of the IEEE in 2005.

The author of over a hundred peer-reviewed scientific articles in multidimensional signal modeling, computer vision, pattern recognition, machine learning, and human-computer interaction, Picard is known internationally for pioneering research in affective computing and, prior to that, for pioneering research in content-based image and video retrieval. She is recipient (with Tom Minka) of a best paper prize for work on machine learning with multiple models (1998) and is recipient (with Barry Kort and Rob Reilly) of a "best theory paper" prize for their work on affect in human learning (2001). Her award-winning book, Affective Computing, (MIT Press, 1997) lays the groundwork for giving machines the skills of emotional intelligence. She and her students have designed and developed a variety of new sensors, algorithms, and systems for sensing, recognizing, and responding respectfully to human affective information, with applications in human and machine learning, health, and human-computer interaction.

Dr. Picard has served on dozens of national and international science and engineering program committees, editorial boards, and review panels, and is presently serving on the Editorial Board of User Modeling and User-Adapted Interaction: The Journal of Personalization Research, as well as on the Advisory Committee for the National Science Foundation's division of Computers in Science and Engineering (CISE) and the Advisory Board for the Georgia Tech College of Computing.

Picard has worked as a consultant for companies such as Apple, AT&T, BT, HP, i.Robot, and Motorola. She has been the keynote presenter or invited plenary speaker at over fifty science or technology events, and has delivered distinguished lectures and colloquia at dozens of universities and research labs internationally. Her group's achievements have been featured in national and international forums for the general public, such as The New York Times, The London Independent, Scientific American Frontiers, NPR's Tech Nation and The Connection, ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight with Peter Jennings, Time, Vogue, Voice of America Radio, New Scientist, and BBC's "The Works" and "The Big Byte." Picard lives in Newton, Massachusetts with her husband and three energetic sons.

Rana El Kaliouby: El Kaliouby is currently a postdoctoral associate at MIT’s Media Laboratory, inventing novel technologies and experiences that enhance “mind-reading”, or social-emotional and empathic abilities of people and machines. She is passionate about creating new ways for people to capture, learn from and share their experiences and memories, drawing on and exploring the important role of affect in learning and memory.

Her current research is developing the first wearable prostheses designed to enrich the social lives of individuals with autism spectrum conditions, by augmenting their social-emotional capacities. El Kaliouby holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, and a Bachelor and a Masters degree in Computer Science (with minor in Business Administration and Electronics) from the American University in Cairo. Her doctoral dissertation, which has been nominated to the British Computer Society Distinguished Dissertation Award, broke new ground in advancing the nascent ability of machines to infer cognitive-affective mental states in real time from nonverbal expressions of people; her work is being applied to human-computer interaction, social robotics and social-emotional communication wearables for autism, as well as in learning contexts and to measure magical experiences.

El Kaliouby is the 2006 recipient of the Global Women and Inventors Network, Higher Education & Learning Institutes (Gold Award). She has written several books chapters and refereed articles on the topic of Mind-reading Machines; her paper, co-authored with Peter Robinson “Real-Time Inference of Complex Mental States from Facial Expressions and Head Gestures” won the 2005 Publication of the Year award by the Computer Lab Graduate Ring. El Kaliouby is passionate about teaching and sharing her research with students and the public. She has taught at the American University in Cairo, and is currently co-teaching the first Autism Theory and Technology course with Professors Rosalind Picard, Cynthia Breazeal and Sherry Turkle at MIT. She also exhibits her work regularly to engage the public in the research and to encourage more under-represented individuals to pursue a career in technology innovation - she has exhibited her work at the Royal Society Summer 2006 Science Exhibition in London and Scotland, where 3000 people interacted with the mindreading system in real time, exploring their expressions of emotion. Her work has been featured in the NewScientist, Reuters, CNET, Wired, the Boston Globe, New York Times, Slashdot and BoingBoing.

Helen Sloan and SCAN: Helen Sloan has worked as a curator, researcher, writer, editor and producer in media arts and culture since late 1980s. Since 2003, she has beenDirector of SCAN, a networked organisation and creative development agency

for media arts in the South of England working on media arts projects and strategic initiatives in arts organisations, academic institutions and further aspects of the public realm. Helen has worked both freelance and as a curator at organisations such as Camerawork, FACT, ICA and Site Gallery as well as directing festivals such as Across Two Cultures in Newcastle 1996 (an early conference on the overlapping practice of creative thinking in arts and science) and Metapod, Birmingham 2001 - 2. Current areas of

interest and curatorial work inlcude the points of intersection of science and culture, immersive environments, and wearable and soft technologies. She recently edited the DVDROM of the proceedings from the international conference Wearable Futures: Hybrid Culture in the Design and Development of Soft Technology organised by SCAN with University of Wales and other partners.

 

tina gonsalves
http://www.tinagonsalves.com